Hurricanes Bruins NHL replay call irks coach Rod Brind’Amour

Carolina Hurricanes head coach Rod Brind'Amourin, top, and members of the team watch as the Hurricanes trail the Boston Bruins in the third period of Game 4 of an NHL hockey Stanley Cup first-round playoff series, Sunday, May 8, 2022, in Boston.  (AP Photo / Steven Senne)

Carolina Hurricanes head coach Rod Brind’Amourin, top, and members of the team watch as the Hurricanes trail the Boston Bruins in the third period of Game 4 of an NHL hockey Stanley Cup first-round playoff series, Sunday, May 8, 2022, in Boston. (AP Photo / Steven Senne)

AP

Rod Brind’Amour probably saved himself $ 25,000 this time around with more moderate criticism of a controversial review of a Boston Bruins goal, but he could not help alluding to that expensive – and equally frustrating – moment two years ago.

Then, in the Toronto bubble, it was a Charlie Coyle goal allowed over the Carolina Hurricanes’ objections. Sunday, it was Jake DeBrusk’s score-tying goal late in the second period of a 5-2 Hurricanes loss in Game 4, the pivotal turning point in the entire game.

The Hurricanes argued that DeBrusk had contacted Antti Raanta’s left pad from Raanta’s left and shoved the goalie over the goal line. DeBrusk then knocked the loose puck into the net. But the NHL ruled it was “incidental contact” while “making a play on the loose puck in the crease.”

Which was particularly frustrating for the Hurricanes, because they had an apparent Nino Niederreiter goal disallowed in Game 1 on essentially the same play, the on-ice officials ruling that Niederretier had contacted Linus Ullmark’s pads in the process of playing the puck.

“I would bet my life on that one. So it’s tough, ”Brind’Amour said. “It’s clearly, especially the view we saw after, it’s in between his pads, loose, I’m all good with that. But the guy came from the side, pushes the pad, squirts the puck out, taps it in. It’s a little different to me if the guy had come in from the front and was actually playing the puck. You can not play the puck when it’s between his legs from the side and knock the goalie sideways, turn him to squirt it out.

“If you can, then I do not know how Niederreiter’s goal is not a goal in the first game when they said it was 100 percent not a goal. It’s frustrating because it almost feels like we’re living this again from four years ago when we had an issue, as you know, I’m not going to go into it. “

Four years ago, two years ago – either way Brind’Amour was referring to his comments to the News & Observer after the Coyle goal, in which he famously called the NHL “a joke” and the play “a crime scene” and was fined $ 25,000 and put on double-secret probation within a matter of hours.

In this case, the decision to challenge was doubly costly because the Hurricanes had been called for four straight penalties and the failed challenge made it a fifth, followed shortly thereafter by Sebastian Aho high-sticking Patrice Bergeron in the face to make it a two- man advantage. The Bruins scored as the first penalty expired to make it 3-2 and never looked back.

“Everyone’s got opinions, but the refs looked it over and made their call and it is what it is,” said Hurricanes defenseman Brett Pesce, who was closest to the play. “We’ll move on.”

Sports columnist Luke DeCock joined The News & Observer in 2000 and has covered six Final Fours, the Summer Olympics, the Super Bowl and the Carolina Hurricanes’ Stanley Cup. He is the current president of the US Basketball Writers Association, was the 2020 winner of the National Headliner Award as the country’s top sports columnist and has twice been named North Carolina Sportswriter of the Year.

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